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Most Satisfying Fly Kill

So there was this massive fly buzzing around my room all day and landing on my face and food and it was super irritating. Ollie used to take care of those for me by catching and eating them, but ever since his accident he hasn’t quite had the speed to catch them. So I finally got fed up and decided it was time for the fly to go. I ran into the kitchen and got our electric fly swatter. When I got back, the sucker tried to hide in a crack between the sliding glass window. However, I was able to stick the swatter into the crack and wait for him to land on it. He quickly proceeded to fly into the swatter and get shocked, leading to him falling to the bottom of he crack and landing directly in a spider web, where a giant spider promptly ran out, grabbed him, and began its meal. It was quite satisfying.

Your welcome spider, and thank you for your bug-eating services

revgrlutena asked:

Can I ask how you trained kitty for shake and spin? My Bug has sit, up, and comes to her name down but none of the signals I'm giving for other tricks seem to connect with her. It tickles me to have a cat who does tricks.

Of course! I’m happy to explain :) I love having cats that do tricks because people are always so surprised! lol They can learn tricks just like dogs. 

So for “shake” I initially started by having the cat sit somewhere with an edge, like the edge of a bed or table. I then held the treat in my right hand and showed it to her, just out of reach. Eventually, she reached out for it with her paw, and I said “good girl” and gave her the treat. She learned pretty quickly to bat at my hand in order to get the treat. Then I started to make the treat harder to see in my hand. I’d keep my hand half-closed so the treat barely showed. She would still bat at my hand. Eventually, she would do it without being able to see the treat at all. At that point, I stopped holding the treat in that hand, and instead gave her the treat with my other hand after she offered the behavior I was looking for. That got her out of the mindset of “trying to hit the treat out of your hand” and into the mindset of “touching your hand with my paw gets me a treat.” Finally, I could start opening my hand into the “shake” position. She could see that there was no treat in my hand, but would still offer her paw. The open hand, not the treat, had now become her cue for the behavior. That’s the method that I’ve used to teach two of my cats how to shake. 

For spin, I simply held the treat between my thumb and pointer finger, held it up to her nose, and moved it around her body in the “spin” motion. She naturally followed my hand, and when she had spun all the way around, I said “good girl” and gave her the treat. After a few rounds of that, I no longer held the treat in my hand, but used just my pointer finger to guide her. She had gotten used to following my hand for treats, so even without the treats present she still followed my finger in a circle. Over time, all I had to do was move my finger in a circle above her head and she knew what to do. I did that with her over and over, then finally reduced the signal to just spinning my finger in front of her. She was confused at first, and several times I had to go back and guide her into the spin again, but eventually she offered the spin behavior on her own. I jackpotted her for it (jackpot means giving them an extra big reward). And she understood from then on :)

Now she offers the “spin” and “shake” behavior all the time! lol I need to work on getting them under stimulus control, which means the animal only offers the behavior when asked. It’ll take a little time to get them all down, but she’s learning fast!

suggitup:

physicalalex:

angelromanvstheworld:

grubby—garbage-queen:

viele-katzen:

marina-and-the-dragons:

spread-hope-inspire:

Tribute to Steve Irwin, a guy who genuinely loved nature and animals.

This man was beyond real

"Crocodiles are easy. They try to kill and eat you. People are harder. Sometimes they pretend to be your friend first."
- Steve Irwin (r.i.p.)

okay but that snake bit him right in the neck and he didnt even flinch

thats how you know he’s australian….

Funny joke aside, he also knew that the snake he was handling was not venomous, it was only biting him to show it was not happy with the situation it was put in. If it was venomous, he wouldnt have had it that close to himself

“If we can teach people about wildlife, they will be touched. Share my wildlife with me. Because humans want to save things that they love.”

- Steve Irwin

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